Posts Tagged ‘Samuel Argall’

Governor’s Land V-41

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

Inscription:

Situated near Jamestown, Governor’s Land originally was a 3,000-acre tract encompassing open fields between the James River and Powhatan Creek. The Virginia Company of London set the parcel aside in 1618 to seat tenants who worked the land, giving half the profits to maintain the office of the governor. Deputy Governor Samuel Argall had already established the private settlement of Argall’s Town in these environs in 1617. Virginia governors also leased the property to others. Colonial leaders including William Drummond, governor of the Carolina proprietary (1665–1667) and an insurgent in Bacon’s Rebellion of 1676 held lease-holds here. Portions of tract provided income to Virginia governors into the 18th century.

Further Research

Samuel Argall

Samuel Argall was active governor of Virginia beginning in 1617 and ending in 1619, when he was replaced by George Yeardley (Grizzard and Smith, 16). Although he was not one of the original colonists to arrive in Virginia, he is quite a notable figure in the history of Virginia and he played an integral role in the English settlement of the colony. Argall arrived in the colony around 1609 and for a few years he was able to explore the Chesapeake region and study its native inhabitants (Grizzard and Smith, 14).  In 1613, he was responsible for the kidnapping of  Pocahontas. Although she was treated fairly well for being a hostage, she was held for a ransom to be exchanged for a variety of English weapons, tools and prisoners that the Powhatan natives had come into possession of; however, she was never returned back to the Powhatan natives (Grizzard and Smith, 14).

Volunteers and Students Dig at the Argall Towne Site

In 1617, Samuel Argall established the small, short-lived area of Argall’s Town,  also known as Argall’s Guift (Hatch, 36). He was most attracted to the land west of Jamestown, and in 1617 he had been allotted 2,400 acres in a charter from England.  After building a settlement in his newly established “Argall’s Town,” in 1619 he was forced to surrender his land back to Governor Yeardley, as this land was the “Governor’s Land” (Hatch, 37).  Yeardley achieved this by making each settler pay a “petty rente” to make sure they acknowledged that this land had been wrongfully settled on (Hatch, 37).

 

Further Reading

Grizzard, Jr. Frank E. and D. Boyd Smith. Jamestown Colony: A Political, Social, and Cultural History. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 2007.

Hatch, Jr. Charles E. The First Seventeen Years in Virginia: 1607- 1624. Charlottesville: The University Press of Virginia, 1957.

Photo Credits

Historical Marker “Governor’s Land V-41,” courtesy of Lindsey Smith, 2012.

“Sir Samuel Argall,” Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com (accessed April 30, 2012).

“Volunteers and Students Dig at the Argall Towne Site,” The Virginia Gazette: 1617 Village is Near Jamestown, www.vagazette.com (accessed April 30, 2012).

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Department of Historic Resources link not available

James City County Z-266

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Inscription:

One of the original shires formed in 1634, and named for Jamestown, the first settlement in Virginia, 1607. Williamsburg is in this county.

 

 

 

Further Research

Map of the 8 Original Shires

James City county was one of the eight original shires that were formed in 1634 in the state of Virginia. The first claim to land was made in 1619, where it was proclaimed by the Governor Samuel Argall:

“To all to whom these presents shall come, I Samuel Argall, Esq., and principal Governor of Virginia, do by these presents testify, and upon my certain Knowledge hereby do make manifest the bounds and limits of Jamestown how far it doth extend every way that is to say the whole island, with part of the main land lying on the East side of Argall town, and adjoining upon the said Island, also the neck of land on the north part, and so to the further part of Archer* ‘s Hope ; also Hog Island ; and from thence to the four mile Tree on the south, usually called by the name of Tappahannock, in all which several places of ground I hereby give, leave and license for the inhabitants of Jamestown to plant as members of the corporation and parish of the same. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand the 28 the day of March [0. S.] in the year of our Lord 1619, and on the 12 the year of the plantation” (Brown, 287-288).

Portrait of Samuel Argall

This was then passed on to the General Assembly, which set up the then-final placement of James City County borders. According to the census, there were approximately 886 people living there at this time (Foley, VI-VII). Prior to its division by the royal crown, Virginia had been settling Jamestown in 1607. They were a business venture that had gone poorly within the first set of years, developing diseases and disorders, such as malaria or intestinal issues. It was not until 1619 that a government had sprung up into the area, but five years later, the charter was revoked and the crown owned all of Virginia (Lewis, 9).

Further Reading

Brown, Alexander. The First Republic in America. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1898.

Foley, Louise Pledge Heath. Early Virginia Families Along the James River. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1990.

Lewis, Sarah. James City County. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2009.

Photo Credits

Historical Marker “James City County Z-266,” courtesy of Lindsey Smith, 2012.

“Map of the 8 Original Shires,” Original Shires of Virginia, http://lawsondna.org (accessed May 2, 2012).

“Sir Samuel Argall,” Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com (accessed May 2, 2012).

View on Google Maps

Department of Historic Resources

This marker and James City County Z-145 share the same marker inscription and information.  Please click here for James City County Z-145.

James City County Z-145

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

Inscription:

One of the original shires formed in 1634, and named for Jamestown, the first settlement in Virginia, 1607. Williamsburg is in this county.

 

 

 

Further Reading

Map of the 8 Original Shires

James City county was one of the eight original shires that were formed in 1634 in the state of Virginia. The first claim to land was made in 1619, where it was proclaimed by the Governor Samuel Argall:

“To all to whom these presents shall come, I Samuel Argall, Esq., and principal Governor of Virginia, do by these presents testify, and upon my certain Knowledge hereby do make manifest the bounds and limits of Jamestown how far it doth extend every way that is to say the whole island, with part of the main land lying on the East side of Argall town, and adjoining upon the said Island, also the neck of land on the north part, and so to the further part of Archer* ‘s Hope ; also Hog Island ; and from thence to the four mile Tree on the south, usually called by the name of Tappahannock, in all which several places of ground I hereby give, leave and license for the inhabitants of Jamestown to plant as members of the corporation and parish of the same. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand the 28 the day of March [0. S.] in the year of our Lord 1619, and on the 12 the year of the plantation” (Brown, 287-288).

Portrait of Samuel Argall

This was then passed on to the General Assembly, which set up the then-final placement of James City County borders. According to the census, there were approximately 886 people living there at this time (Foley, VI-VII). Prior to its division by the royal crown, Virginia had been settling Jamestown in 1607. They were a business venture that had gone poorly within the first set of years, developing diseases and disorders, such as malaria or intestinal issues. It was not until 1619 that a government had sprung up into the area, but five years later, the charter was revoked and the crown owned all of Virginia (Lewis, 9).

 

Further Reading

Brown, Alexander. The First Republic in America. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1898.

Foley, Louise Pledge Heath. Early Virginia Families Along the James River. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1990.

Lewis, Sarah. James City County. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2009.

Photo Credits

Historical Marker “James City County Z-266,” courtesy of Lindsey Smith, 2012.

“Map of the 8 Original Shires,” Original Shires of Virginia, http://lawsondna.org (accessed May 2, 2012).

“Sir Samuel Argall,” Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com (accessed May 2, 2012).

View on Google Maps

Department of Historic Resources

This marker and James City County Z-266 share the same marker text and info.  Click here for James City County Z-266.